Supreme Leader: Iraq should stop US officials' words on disintegration
Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei in a meeting with Iraqi President Fuad Masum in Tehran stressed the necessity for Baghdad to take a tough position against US officials statements about dividing Iraq.

"The Iraqi people, including the Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds and Arabs have been living beside each other without any problem for centuries but unfortunately, certain regional states and the aliens are seeking to magnify the differences and they should be confronted and any pretext for differences should be avoided," Ayatollah Khamenei said during the meeting on Tuesday morning.

"The atmosphere shouldn’t move on in a way to give courage to the Americans to publically speak of Iraq's disintegration," he added.

Ayatollah Khamenei also underlined Iran's preparedness to transfer its experiences to Iraq in the scientific, technological and defensive fields as well as different services, and said, "Efforts should be made to further enhance the level of economic cooperation between the two countries."

Masum, for his part, appreciated Iran for its assistance to Iraq in hard days, specially in campaign against the ISIL terrorist group, and called for the further expansion of relations between Tehran and Baghdad in all fields.

Ayatollah Khamenei's warning remarks came after General Vincent Stewart, the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency, claimed in September that Iraq and Syria were unlikely to emerge intact from years of war and sectarian violence.

In Iraq, the Defense Intelligence Agency boss indicated that he believes it unlikely that a government in Baghdad could hold authority over the disparate regions within the country's official borders.

Stewart claimed that he is "wrestling with the idea that the Kurds will come back to a central government of Iraq".

Also in the same month, CIA Director John Brennan echoed Stewart's idea that the borders of the Middle-Eastern countries have irreparably broken down as a result of war and sectarianism.

"I think the Middle East is going to be seeing change over the coming decade or two that is going to make it look unlike it did," said Brennan, remarking that Iraqis and Syrians now identify themselves more by their tribe or religious sect, than by nationality.

After the comments, Iraqi Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ahmad Jamal lashed out at the US intelligence officials for their comments about disintegration of Iraq and Syria.

"The US officials' remarks on the possible disintegration of Iraq and the zero chance for the country's return to its past conditions are strongly rejected," Jamal told FNA.

Noting that the terrorists active in Iraq today have come from 80 different world states, he said, "The westerners had better prevent the flow of terrorists from their countries to Iraq instead of raising doubt about Iraq's unity."


News Code: 11926  |  Date: 2015/11/24  |  Time: 19 : 3

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